MEDICAL SECOND OPINION

At the end of the seventh month, your baby should be able to sit unaided and eat biscuits alone. Your baby is also likely to do these things: When you take their toy, they may get angry, pass a toy from one hand to the other, turn towards the sound, try to take a distant toy and repeat syllables such as ga-ga, ba-ba, and da-da one after the other. They can stand holding on to someone or something.

At the end of the eight months, , your baby should be able to put some weight on their legs when held up. They should be able to pass the toy from one hand to another. They must seek and find their toy. They should be able to grasp their toys quickly. They should be able to eat biscuits by themselves. They should be able to turn to the sound they hear. Your baby can even play a game of peek-a-boo with you. When you take their toy, they may object to it. They can stand by holding on. They can sit on their stomach. Some babies can grasp small objects using their thumbs and index fingers.

At the end of the ninth month, they should be able to search for their toy. They should try to take their toy that is out of reach. Your baby is likely to be able to stand up from a sitting position. They can move from a prone to a sitting position. They can stand by holding on. They can use thumb and forefinger. They can wave their hands. You can teach them some hand games. They can roll a ball.

At the end of the 10th month, they must be able to stand by holding on. They must be able to stand up from a sitting position. Even if unconsciously, they should be able to say mama or papa. They should be able to play peek-a-boo. They should be able to object to you when you take their toy. Some babies can clap or wave at the end of 10 months. They can start sorting. Now they know the meaning of the word no. Discipline can be started after this month. Some babies may consciously say, mama or papa. Some babies walk at the age of 10 months.

At the end of the eleventh month, your baby must be able to move from a prone to a sitting position, use their index and thumbs well, and understand the word no. Your baby can sort things quickly, stand up momentarily, and say words other than mom or dad.

At the end of the twelfth month, your baby should be able to hold and sort things. Crawling babies walk later, and delayed walking is not a concern. Most babies cannot walk before 14 months, clap before 13 months, play ball before 16 months, or produce gibberish-like sounds before 15 months. However, some babies can do these at 12 months old.

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Baby Development Month by Month

Newborns

Newborn babies often don't look as good as you might expect. Their heads are more significant than their bodies. They are thin and may have a slight curvature. Their eyes may squint. If it was a vaginal delivery, the nose is flat, and the chin is crooked. If pressure was used at birth, the head may be corrupt. Due to the hormones passed from the mother, both girls and boys have swollen breasts, and sometimes milk may come.
Vaginal discharge can sometimes be seen in female babies. However, these disappear within a few weeks. Their hair is sparse, sometimes even absent. On the head, there are areas of fontanel. The skin is light pink.

When you lay your newborn on its stomach, it can hold its head upright and move its arms equally on both sides of the body. It can also focus on objects 16-30 cm away from its eyes.

At the end of the 1st month , your baby should be able to hold their head upright when placed on their stomach. They should be able to focus on your face. Some babies can follow an object moving in an arc from 15 cm to the midline. They can make sounds other than crying. They can raise their head for 45 degrees when on their stomach. They may respond to your laughter with a smile.

At the end of the second month, they can follow an object 15 cm from their face to the end. They somehow react to rattle toys. They respond to your smile. They can make sounds other than crying. These are the things your baby should do now. Some babies can hold their head up 45 degrees while on the tummy. They can even hold their heads up high. They can roll from one side to the other. They can lift their body slightly with their arms.

At the end of the third month, your baby should now be able to hold their head up 45 degrees while on their tummy. They should be able to follow an object 15 cm away from their face in all directions. Your baby can laugh out loud, hold their head up 90 degrees when on their tummy, laugh spontaneously, and hold their head up when sitting upright.

At the end of the fourth month, your baby should be able to raise their head 90 degrees while on their stomach, follow an object 15 cm away from their face for 180 degrees, and laugh out loud. If your baby cannot perform some of these developmental stages, you should have the doctor check them. Sometimes, this can indicate a problem. But most of the time, there is no problem. Some babies can hold their heads upright, roll over, grasp a toy when touching it, pay attention to small objects, and scream joyfully. They may turn towards their mother's voice. They can straighten up on their arms.

At the end of the fifth month, your baby should be able to hold their head up when sitting upright. They can straighten up with their arms while on their stomach. They can roll to one side. They can reach for an object. They can scream with joy. They can grasp their toys. They can pay attention to small objects. They can smile spontaneously. Some babies can put some weight on their legs. They can keep their heads level with their bodies when seated with their hands pulled away. They can make several different sounds, such as babbling.

At the end of the sixth month, your baby should be able to hold their head up high, make different sounds, and probably put some weight on their legs. By then, most babies can sit up unaided. Some babies may get angry when you take their toy, hold on to an object, or eat a biscuit alone. They can pass a toy from one hand to the other, be directed towards a sound, try to pick up their distant toy and repeat syllables such as " ga-ga, " " ba-ba, " and " da-da " one after another.

At the end of the seventh month, your baby should be able to sit unaided and eat biscuits alone. Your baby is also likely to do these things: When you take their toy, they may get angry, pass a toy from one hand to the other, turn towards the sound, try to take a distant toy and repeat syllables such as ga-ga, ba-ba, and da-da one after the other. They can stand holding on to someone or something.

At the end of the eight months, , your baby should be able to put some weight on their legs when held up. They should be able to pass the toy from one hand to another. They must seek and find their toy. They should be able to grasp their toys quickly. They should be able to eat biscuits by themselves. They should be able to turn to the sound they hear. Your baby can even play a game of peek-a-boo with you. When you take their toy, they may object to it. They can stand by holding on. They can sit on their stomach. Some babies can grasp small objects using their thumbs and index fingers.

At the end of the ninth month, they should be able to search for their toy. They should try to take their toy that is out of reach. Your baby is likely to be able to stand up from a sitting position. They can move from a prone to a sitting position. They can stand by holding on. They can use thumb and forefinger. They can wave their hands. You can teach them some hand games. They can roll a ball.

At the end of the 10th month, they must be able to stand by holding on. They must be able to stand up from a sitting position. Even if unconsciously, they should be able to say mama or papa. They should be able to play peek-a-boo. They should be able to object to you when you take their toy. Some babies can clap or wave at the end of 10 months. They can start sorting. Now they know the meaning of the word no. Discipline can be started after this month. Some babies may consciously say, mama or papa. Some babies walk at the age of 10 months.

At the end of the eleventh month, your baby must be able to move from a prone to a sitting position, use their index and thumbs well, and understand the word no. Your baby can sort things quickly, stand up momentarily, and say words other than mom or dad.

At the end of the twelfth month, your baby should be able to hold and sort things. Crawling babies walk later, and delayed walking is not a concern. Most babies cannot walk before 14 months, clap before 13 months, play ball before 16 months, or produce gibberish-like sounds before 15 months. However, some babies can do these at 12 months old.

Created at 15.06.2024 04:04
Updated at 15.06.2024 04:04
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